Review of “Pharmacology is Murder” by Dirk Wyle

I start with a bias against the murder mystery genre. In spite of its evident popularity, I don’t like stories that trivialize and sanitize violence, particularly the horrific act of murder. That said, I think Asimov’s A Whiff of Death is one of the best-constructed murder mysteries I’ve read on the Lab Lit List. It’s […]

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Novels Reviewed to Date

Following are the titles of all the novels reviewed in this blog to date along with my personal recommendations. Asterisks (*) indicate either short reviews or references to reviews posted to other sites. Each title is a link to the review. Dates indicate when the review was posted. (This page will be updated as new […]

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Review of “A Whiff of Death” by Isaac Asimov

A Whiff of Death is an early (1958) mystery by Isaac Asimov, a writer best known for his science fiction. It’s a classic, well-executed whodunit, complete with a surprise ending, and it fits the LabLit definition as well. If you’re a fan of this genre, it’s a great example of the scientist turned sleuth, especially […]

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The Novelist as a Scientist of the Mind

In his novel Thinks…, David Lodge uses the technique of having more than one first-person narrators.  However, I’m more interested in the first-person narration technique itself and what it tells us about our inner lives.  Thus, his protagonists are a novelist, whose work involves imagining the private thoughts and feelings of her characters (as opposed […]

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Review of “Thinks…” by David Lodge

David Lodge’s Thinks… is an “academic” novel, a story set on a university campus, ostensibly about an affair between two faculty members.  However, the real story is about consciousness, a hot topic in cognitive science in recent decades.  The man, Ralph Messenger, typifies the established academic, whose duties include teaching both undergraduate and graduate students, […]

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Reviews of Two Fictionalized Biographies

I had read two other fictionalized biographies before I began blogging about fiction about science. It’s been long enough since I read them that I hesitate to write as detailed review as I have previously. However, my current recollections of these two books are instructive and raise an interesting question about this kind of novel. […]

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Review of “The God Patent” on LabLit.com

My review of The God Patent by Ransom Stephens is now live on the Lab Lit website. This is a wonderful mix of real science, science-fiction and religion, with a collection of appealing characters, about as different from each other as conceivable. If you are looking for fiction about science and scientists, Stephen’s  novel deserves your […]

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Review of “Measuring the World” by Daniel Kehlmann

In 1828, Carl Fredrich Gauss, the “Prince of Mathematics,” traveled from his home in Göttingen, Germany, to Berlin at the invitation of Alexander von Humboldt, the world-renowned explorer.  By the time of the meeting Gauss was already widely recognized as the greatest mathematician of his time.  Some would even today a rank him as the […]

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